Stage Guide > Toon Boom Harmony 10 Stage User Guide > Chapter 15: Sound > Editing a Sound File > Trimming the Start and End of a Sound File
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Trimming the Start and End of a Sound File

To play only a section of a sound file, use the Sound Element Editor to select the exact part you want to use. For example, if there is a bit of noise at the start of the sound, use the Sound Element Editor to cut the noise.

The Sound Element Editor does not change the original sound file; it only plays a section of it, ignoring the rest. This means that the entire sound file is included on export. If you need to be mindful of file size, it is better to edit sound files completely in a sound editor before bringing them into Harmony.

To trim the start and end of a sound file:

1. Either double-click the sound layer name in the Timeline view or the sound column header in the Xsheet view to open the Sound Element editor.
2. Select the sound you want to work on from the Sound Element panel.
3. Select the sound sample you want from the Sound Element panel. To distinguish one sound section from another on the same sound layer, check the frame numbers that appear on tabs flanking the start and stop lines of each waveform section. Or select a soundwave and click on the Play  button in the Current Sound panel (only the selected sound will play).
4. Using the Current Sound panel, you can decide which part of the file you want to play by dragging the left and right boundaries of the selection area.

5. Click on the Play  button in the Current Sound panel to check that you have trimmed the desired sections. Use the Zoom slider at the bottom of the panel to zoom in on the wave form so that you can trim it more accurately.

6. Click on the Apply/Next button.

The trimmed sound sample should now appear in both the Timeline and Xsheet views at the start and end positions that you selected.

Related Topics 

Changing the Start or End Frame of a Sound
Looping a Sound
Mixing the Sound Volume
Customizing the Playback Range